Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey appoints immunotherapy chief

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January 16, 2021

1 min read

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Christian Hinrichs, MD, has been appointed chief of the section of cancer immunotherapy at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

Hinrichs also will serve as co-director of the Cancer Immunology and Metabolism Center of Excellence, along with Eileen White, PhD, the cancer institute’s deputy director and chief scientific officer.

Christian Hinrichs, MD

Christian Hinrichs

“With strong cancer care and basic research, cutting-edge cell therapy manufacturing facilities, and generous philanthropic support of the Center of Excellence, Rutgers Cancer Institute is positioned to be an international leader in tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy research,” Hinrichs said in a press release. “I look forward to working with Dr. White to develop a center that integrates her groundbreaking research in cancer metabolism and cutting-edge immunotherapy to improve cancer treatment for patients.”

Hinrichs most recently served as tenured senior investigator in the NCI’s Genitourinary Malignancies Branch.

His research focuses on tumor response and resistance. He has helped develop cellular therapy for common malignancies that begin in epithelial cells. He also has helped develop new treatments for HPV-associated cancers.

“The recruitment of Dr. Hinrichs enables us to build world-class tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy programs,” Steven K. Libutti, MD, FACS, director of Rutgers Cancer Institute and senior vice president of oncology services for RWJBarnabas Health, said in the release. “Leveraging his expertise in tumor immunology with that of Dr. White in the area of cancer metabolism, the exploration conducted through the Center of Excellence will help us understand why some patients respond to cancer treatments and others do not and lead to the development of clinical trials to test novel cancer treatments.”